Singer Songwriter Luke Haines flies back to his homeland

 ART WILL SAVE THE WORLD. Singer Songwriter Luke Haines flies back to his homeland to discuss his life on film. Wary of the idea of a film about his life and weary from the long plane ride home from Buenos Aires. While left waiting to go on set, he attempts to piece together his life.

Through fragments of his existence thus far, comments from his contemporaries and friends, including, musician Jarvis Cocker, novelist David Peace and Arthur Matthews, amongst others, we will discuss the work, legacy, struggles, battles and future of the perennial outsider of Britpop and the British Music Scene. Haines has regularly been described in the media as one of the greatest English contemporary songwriters, the man who launched bad ship Britpop (whatever that was) and jumped ship as soon as it set sail. His wry commentaries respect few boundaries and his musical arrangements are uniquely suited to both the worlds of music and film. He is equally at home writing about teenage sex, terrorism, pop/film stars, child murder or broken love affairs, yet the instrumental versions of his tunes stand firm. Here we meet again the forgotten man. Singer. Songwriter. Novelist. Artist. Luke Haines is not dead. He is alive and well and back in London…..

Director of the film, Niall McCann, was included in the Sunday Times Culture Magazine’s top 30 Irish Artists under 30 in September 24th 2010 issue. The film was selected for the Telasonika Film Festival talent Campus of 2008.  Quotes about Luke Haines: “…What kind of world do we live in where Haines is not considered a living, or at least un-dead, legend as improperly perceptive as Joe Orton, as psychotically sensitive as Chris Morris, as terribly treasured as Morrissey, as truly lost and found as Ray Davies, as cultishly grand as Roy Harper, as playfully vicious as Peter Cook, as abrasively miserable as Spike Milligan, as blunt bitter and twisted as Colin Wilson? Paul Morley “63 ways to start an essay on Luke Haines”

Luke Haines was born in 1967. He learned guitar in the red light district of Portsmouth and Subsequently he formally studied music at the London College of Music. After a short period in a group called The Servants, he signed to Hut Recordings in 1992 as The Auteurs.  Their debut album, ‘New Wave’, was shortlisted for the prestigious Mercury Music Prize. Since then he has released albums as The Auteurs (‘Now I’m A Cowboy’, ‘After Murder Park’, and ‘How I Learned To Love The Bootboys’), as Baader Meinhof (‘Baader Meinhof’) and is a founder member of Black Box Recorder (‘England Made Me’, ‘The Facts Of Life’, ‘Passionoia’) and currently under his own name.  The Auteurs have toured worldwide. Haines has regularly been described in the media as one of the greatest English contemporary songwriters. His wry commentaries respect few boundaries and his musical arrangements are uniquely suited both to the worlds of music and film. He is equally at home writing about teenage sex, terrorism, pop/film stars, child murder or broken love affairs, yet the instrumental versions of his tunes stand firm. His prodigious output speaks for itself.

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Posted on July 9, 2012, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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